Friday, February 10, 2006

Climate 'warmest for millennium' - research finds

The last 100 years is more striking than either the Medieval Warm Period or Little Ice Age Timothy Osborn, UEA In the late 20th Century, the northern hemisphere experienced its most widespread warmth for 1,200 years, according to the journal Science. The findings support evidence pointing to unprecedented recent warming of the climate linked to greenhouse emissions.
The UEA team showed that the present warm period is the most widespread temperature anomaly of any kind since the ninth century.
The records included long life evergreen trees growing in Scandinavia, Siberia and the Rockies which had been cored to reveal the patterns of wide and narrow tree rings over time. Wider rings related to warmer temperatures.
The chemical composition of ice from cores drilled in the Greenland ice sheets revealed which years were warmer than others.
In November, Science published a paper showing atmospheric levels of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane are higher now than at any time in the past 650,000 years.

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